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Incandescent Lighting

Since Edison developed the first practical incandescent light bulbs in 1880, they have remained the primary source of illumination in a wide array of applications. As environmental concerns spark “Green” initiatives and new legislation is introduced in many countries around the world to demand reductions in energy consumption, the lighting industry is challenged to replace the incandescent light bulb with new and more efficient technologies.

Advantages

  • Cheap
  • Large amounts of visible light
  • No electronics required

Disadvantages

  • Poor efficiency
    • ~10% input energy = light
    • ~90% input energy = radiated heat
    • 10-30 lumens/watt (efficacy)
  • Short life: 1000–2000 hours

Variations

  • Halogen, metal halide

Incandescent light sources are good at creating large amounts of visible light and even greater amounts of heat. As a result, a typical light bulb is not very efficient; approximately 10% of the input energy is output as light while the remaining 90% is wasted as radiated heat. The typical light bulb has a relatively short lifetime, ranging from several hundred to a couple thousand hours, due to the extreme heat of the tungsten filament causing it to evaporate and eventually fail.

Incandescent lighting efficiency can however be maximized via the creation of intelligent controls with capabilities such as timers, environmental sensing, wired/wireless communications and touch sensing.

Dimming Incandescent Lamps


Early dimmers were simple variable resistors in series with the lamp to adjust the light level. Varying the resistance directly affects current flow to the lamp filament, directly affecting the light output.

With the advent of semiconductor switches (rectifiers and thyristors), a new method of dimming was born. This dimming method involves delaying the turn-on time of a triac until a controlled time after each zero crossing of an AC signal. The delay circuit is comprised of an RC network with a variable resistance. This solution is simple, but a significant amount heat is still dissipated in the resistor due to the high voltages involved.

A much more efficient variation utilizes a PIC® microcontroller to generate an appropriate time delay for a triac, resulting in higher efficiency and accurate dimming control. Additionally, a PIC microcontroller implementation lends itself to numerous advanced control opportunities.

Lighting Products


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View All Parametrics
Product Status Type Input Voltage Low (V) Input Voltage High (V) Max Switch Resistance (Ω)
HV509 In Production 16-Segment Drivers 2.0 5.5 --
HV528 In Production 16-Segment Drivers 1.7 5.5 --
HV809 In Production Offline Driver 50 200 --
HV823 In Production Single Lamp Driver 2.0 9.5 6.0
HV825 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.0 1.6 15
HV830 In Production Single Lamp Driver 2.0 9.5 4.0
HV833 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 6.5 4.0
HV850 In Production Single Inductorless Lamp Driver 3.0 4.2 --
HV852 In Production Single Inductorless Lamp Driver 2.4 5 --
HV853 In Production Single Inductorless Lamp Driver 3.2 5 --
HV857 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 5 6.0
HV857L In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 5 6.0
HV859 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 5 6.0
HV860 In Production Single Lamp Driver 2.5 4.5 6.0
HV861 In Production Dual Lamp Drivers 2.5 4.5 7.0
MIC4826 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 5.5 7.0
MIC4827 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 5.5 7.0
MIC4830 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 5.5 7.0
MIC4832 In Production Single Lamp Driver 1.8 5.5 7.0
MIC4833 In Production Dual Lamp Drivers 2.3 5.8 12.0

Documents


Application Notes


Title Download
AN1476 - Combining the CLC and NCO to Implement a High Resolution PWM Download
AN239 - Bit Banged LIN Slave Node for PIC16 & PIC18 Download
AN1427 - High-Efficiency Solutions for Portable LED Lighting Download
TB094 - Dimming AC Incandescent Lamps Using A PIC10F200 Download
DN-H03 - Alternate Use of the HV9922 as an Off-line, Non-isolated, 50 to 100 mA Auxiliary Power Supply Download
AN-H50 - HV9910B: Constant, Off-time, Buck-based LED Driver Download
AN874 - Buck Configuration High-Power LED Driver Download
AN1211 - Maximum Power Solar Converter Download
AN-H58 - Improving the Efficiency of a HV9930/AT9933 Boost-Buck Converter Download
AN1050 - A Technique to Increase the Frequency Resolution of PICmicro MCU PWM Modules Download
AN1261 - Dimming Power LEDs Using a SEPIC Converter and MCP1631 PIC Attach PWM Controller Download
AN-H64 - Compatibility and Functional Differences between the HV9961 and HV9910B LED Drivers Download
AN1271 - Offline Power Converter for High-Brightness LEDs Using the PIC16HV785 Microcontroller Download
AN1035 - Designing with HV Microcontrollers Download
AN-H48 - HV9910B: Buck-based LED Driver Download
AN980 - Designing a Boost-Switching Regulator with the MCP1650 Download
AN954 - Transformerless Power Supplies: Resistive and Capacitive Download
DN-H02 - Isolated Constant Power Converter Using the HV9922 Download
AN1487 - DALI Control Gear Download
AN1138 - A Digital Constant Current Power LED Driver Download
AN1465 - Digitally Addressable Lighting Interface (DALI) Communication Download
AN-H51 - AT9933: Designing a Boost-Buck converter with the HV9930 Download
AN1074 Setup - Software PWM Generation for LED Dimming and RGB Color Applications Download

Firmware


The software in this section is subject to the U.S. Export Administration Regulations and other U.S. law, and may not be exported or re-exported to certain countries or to persons or entities prohibited from receiving U.S. exports (including Denied Parties, entities on the Bureau of Export Administration Entity List, and Specially Designated Nationals).

DALI Code Library


Beta code library available now

Digital Addressable Lighting Interface (DALI) is a standard lighting control protocol for large networked lighting systems. DALI provides bi-directional communications with uniquely addressed light sources. This allows for customized lighting schemes and the ability for the light source to relay information back to the controller (ie. light output level, color, energy usage, etc.).

  • 'C' based firmware library
  • Control Device (master) and Control Gear (slave) libraries
  • Automated commissioning
  • Firmware implementation on any 8-bit PIC® microcontroller
    • PIC microcontroller requirements
      • One 8-bit timer, one 16-bit timer
      • EEPROM or Emulated EEPROM (self-write Flash)
      • ~4KW Flash program memory footprint (final code size TBD)
    • Compliance
      • IEC 62386-101 (DALI general system requirements)
      • IEC 62386-102 (DALI general system requirements – control gear)
      • Future support for IEC 62386-2xx implementation (particular requirements for control gear; e.g. LED, fluorescent, etc.)
 
Downloads

Reference Designs


Title Description Availability Part#
MCP1630 Boost Mode LED Driver Demo Board Uses MCP1630V and a PIC12F device to drive up to 30W LED output power. Input voltage can be 9 - 16V. A string of 5 Cree 1W LEDs is provided with the kit. Now MCP1630DM-LED2
HV9861A LED Driver Demoboard Boost Assisted, Valley Fill, 120VAC Input, 7W Output, 350mA, 20V, Power Factor ~ 93% demo board Now HV9861ADB2
HV9910B LED Driver Demoboard Off-Line, High Brightness, LED Driver Demo Board Now HV9910BDB7
HV9961 LED Driver Demoboard 21-Watt Universal AC LED Driver Demoboard with Accurate Average-Mode Constant Current Control Now HV9961DB1
HV9922 LED Driver Demoboard Universal Off-line LED Driver Demoboard Now HV9922DB1
HV9930 LED Driver Demoboard High Brightness LED Driver IC Demoboard Now HV9930DB1
MCP19114 Flyback Standalone Evaluation Board MCP19114-Flyback Standalone Evaluation Board and Graphical User Interface (GUI) demonstrate the MCP19114 performance in a synchronous Flyback topology. Now ADM00578
MCP19117 Flyback Evaluation Board MCP19117-Flyback Standalone Evaluation Board and Graphical User Interface (GUI) demonstrate the MCP19117 performance in a synchronous Flyback topology. Now ADM00663