Helpful ReplyRN2483 LoRa module

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GrahamS
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2015/08/13 03:17:38 (permalink)
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RN2483 LoRa module

Hi,
 
Is Microchip not offering ANY support to users who want to use this chip (and the awaited US version) ????.
 
Messages on the forum remain unanswered.
 
Tickets get closed without a valid solution,
 
FAE's never call back as promised
 
Support lines take voicemail only - IF you're lucky enough to actually get it to ring :-(( - Try Ireland !!! - just drops out before even ringing.
 
Getting HIGHLY frustrated at being treated like this by Microchip.
 
You sold me the chips but won't answer support requests :-(( - and the documentation is minimal to say the least :-((.
 
Regards
 
Graham
 
#1
roundrocktom
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/08/13 06:31:58 (permalink)
4 (1)
That doesn't sound right at all....
 
What are you trying to link to? I was under the impression the RN2483 has to communicate with a telco provider, and it not used for point to point.   I thought we only had LoRa test sites in Northern California (San Jose Area) or Munich at the moment.
 
Senet Deploys LoRa businesswire article.
 
All I see on Microchip is just a simple overview (hence my impression it needs to handshake with a link partner, but the RN2483 is only half of the solution).
 
When I look at Semtech's development kit -- it shows two modules in their kit. It is expensive at $623 on Digikey, so not something I'd buy personally, even if I am curious about it.
 
Next week, at Microchip Masters, I'll ask around.    I can see a neat "peer to peer" LAN for large farm area's.  I had thought of all sort of idea's for that Microchip 9 axis sensor MM7150.   Irony is biggest user is for monitoring cows. Neat application, but now I see a cow network via LoRa. 
 
Trivia, Mum's family was all from County Galway.  My Grandmother would hand knit our sweaters, but the pattern missed a beat on the knots.  Later I realized every sweater she knitted for family had that pattern to it, but for friends they didn't.  I wonder what she would have thought of Internet connected cows. 
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roundrocktom
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/06 05:44:32 (permalink)
4 (1)
There was a good presentation at Masters.  Lots of material, lots of things to consider.
 
Biggest take away was three different items, class A, class B, class C
Class A is a LoRa end device. 
Class B is a router (LoRa Gateway). It can talk to many different Class A End Devices.
Class C is the (Network Server)  gateway into the WWW (servers, cloud, etc)
 
Class A will send Data only to a Class B router.  Class B router forwards the information into Class C;
if there is a response, it will be returned by Class C, forwarded to Class B, sent to the Class A end device.
 
Class A End Devices do not communicate with each other. They only send their data packet to that Class B router, which is sent to the Server.  So You need class A, class B, and class C devices all implemented, and aware of each other, to communicate between two Class A end devices.
 
Microchip is working on a development kit that will have the "A" and "B" modules and "C" based server, "B" is obviously a third party Lora Gateway, "C" would be on something like a AWS (Amazon Web Services).
 
 
 
 
 
post edited by roundrocktom - 2015/09/06 07:36:06

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roundrocktom
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/06 05:58:14 (permalink)
3 (1)
On other small detail.
 
The RN2483 module has two frequencies.  866Mhz and 434Mhz.
 
The are fixed for RX and TX function.  One for uplink; other for downlink. 
 
Hence a Class A could never be paired with another Class A device.
 
One of the fellows at the class was from Ireland (??) and commented they wanted to only
use 434Mhz for his application. Not possible, you need both up and down links. 
 

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Papula
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/11 07:46:39 (permalink)
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Hi,
 
I am also frustrated of the Microchip support. No answer on tikets.
@GrahamS: have you fond a solution. Does the RN2483work?
 
Maybe one of you can give me a hint. I don't get a communication with the module over UART to the PC.
 
I have connected 2 AA batteries in series (about 3V) to pins 34 and 47. And the UART connection to the PC usind the Pins 1(to SUB-D Pin5), Pin 6(to SUB-D Pin2) and Pin 7(to SUB-D Pin3).
 
At the PC I am using the tool HTerm with the settings 57600,8,1 no parity.
 
When I apply the supply to the RN2483, then I get a strange sequence of Bytes: (in hex): 00 AB AC B3 D9 2C F6 FB A3 8D A3 95 BF 3D 1B BF 9B 9F 9D 97 8B 9D 95 8B 99 99 E5 EB 00
 
But this is not what I expect. I aspect something in ASCII. And there is no reaction of the module at any command (e.g. "sys get ver" with a CR+LF).
I have also tried all BAUD rates from 300 to 115200. Of coarse the start message from the module is differen but always with no sense and always no reaction on commands!
 
Does have anybody get this module working and can help me?
 
Regards
 
Papula
#5
RISC
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/11 12:54:41 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby @JDP 2016/04/12 10:42:49
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Hi,
If you don't have any communication it means that maybe something is not right with your hardware or terminal setup.
Please check the schematic of the Lora Pictail board
Once your hardware is OK you should be able to communicate with the module using the Command Reference users guide.
However, you will only communicate with the module....LoRa needs an infrastructure to communicate (Gateway, router,...) to operate
Regards
 
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Papula
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/12 03:53:29 (permalink)
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Hi RISC!
 
Thanks for the quick response!
 
Yes I have allready checked the LoRa Pictail board. What I am not using are the CTS and RTS for UART handshake. But everywere is described, that these pins are only for future use. Thus I assume I don't need them.
And "a little" comunication is there: After a reset of the RN2483 or after powerup: the module sends always the same string. Thus I belive, that the RN2483 is alive and is sending a "Hello I am ready", but something is wrong, that the content of this sequence makes no sense for me.
 
By the way, I have 2 of the RN2483. At first I want to create a RF connestion between 2 PCs. But with the UART-communication problem I am far away from this. If I don't get it to be functional in the next week, then I will choose another RF modem and will avoid microchip in future.
 
But maybe someone has the RN2483 in operating state and can tell me how?
 
Regards
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Jim Nickerson
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/13 10:40:32 (permalink)
4.5 (2)
Have you read tom's post above ? http://www.microchip.com/forums/FindPost/888015
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wojtek
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/15 03:21:45 (permalink)
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Hi roundrocktom,
 
You've told about development kit with modules A,B,C Microchip works on.
Did Microchip mentioned about release dates? 
Do you maybe know if the modules will be based on new hardware or on already released eval boards (e.g.  or ) ?
 
Maybe somebody from Microchip watching this topic will be able to answer too? 
 
Thanks in advance!
 
post edited by wojtek - 2015/09/15 03:22:57
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roundrocktom
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/16 05:22:57 (permalink)
5 (1)
Feedback was the "development kit" should be out by "end of September". 
RN2903 is the North American Class A End Point, which is also noted "end of September"
 
The development kit will be a Microchip Class A End Point; a Third Party Class B Gateway, and Third Party Class C Server/Cloud partner set up for the demo kit.  I see a bunch of possibilities for the Gateway and Server, but also realize it is easier to herd cats than getting four party demo's up and running.
 
You need all four items, Class A, Class B, Class C, and the Cloud to have these LoRa networks up and running.  Quick review is on Radio-Electronics
 
 
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wojtek
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/09/17 12:34:55 (permalink)
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End of September sounds promising so let's wait and see what will happen :)
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roundrocktom
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2015/10/09 04:19:46 (permalink)
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RN2903:  Production release is 11/02/2015.      So about a month out.
There should be a full development kit released around the same time.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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@JDP
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2016/04/21 02:30:53 (permalink)
4 (1)
Hello RoundRockTom,
 
I have to correct you on your description here, as you are mixing up your terminology.
Classes A, B & C are three different modes of operation for the protocol.
 
- Class A is the default mode and is designed primarily for sleepy end devices. All communication is initiated by the end-device on whatever schedule is needed by the application. It transmits a packet, then has 2 Rx windows where it can listen for the optional ACK, or for a downlink packet from the server. Class A is the lowest power option, has no latency on the uplink, but the latency on the downlink is dictated by the end application and how often it chooses to send uplinks.
 
- Class B adds beacons to synchronise the end-devices with the network. Once synchronised, regular downlink 'ping' slots can be scheduled. This now means that the downlink latency becomes deterministic (128sec, 64sec, 32sec ...) but at the expense of some additional current consumption and protocol complexity. It is still low enough power to be useful for battery powered applications. There is no real support for class B in the market yet. 
 
- Class C simply leaves the Rx window open at all times expect when the Tx window is needed. This effectively eliminates any downlink latency, but at the expense of current consumption of the Rx, which is around 50mW. This makes it a powered application, but for many applications like street lights, load switching etc it is perfect. Class C is starting to gain traction in the market.
 
Thanks
JDP
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@JDP
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Re: RN2483 LoRa module 2016/04/21 02:34:09 (permalink)
3 (1)
roundrocktom
On other small detail.
 
The RN2483 module has two frequencies.  866Mhz and 434Mhz.
 
The are fixed for RX and TX function.  One for uplink; other for downlink. 




Sorry RoundRockTom, but I've got to pick you up on this one too. 
Those two bands of operation are completely independent. The RN2483 modem is EITHER working in the 868 MHz band (both up & down links) OR working in the 434 MHz band (both up & down links). There is no cross over. 
 
Thanks
JDP
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