Microchip Technology Inc

Reference Designs

The MCP1603 Tiny Reference Design demonstrates the use of Microchip's MCP1603 device in a step-down application. The evaluation board is a fully functional platform to evaluate the MCP1603 buck regulator over the input voltage, output voltage and current range of the device. The evaluation board is designed to show off one of the main advantages of the MCP1603 - it's small size.
The MCP1630 Multi-Bay Li-Ion Charger is used to evaluate Microchip’s MCP1630 used in a SEPIC power converter application. The MCP1630 Multi-Bay Li-Ion Charger is capable of charging two single-cell, Li-Ion battery packs in parallel utilizing an input voltage of 10V to 30V (battery packs are not included). Multiple boards can be daisy-chained for additional charger bays. The MCP1630 Multi-Bay Li-Ion Charger is intended for use in pseudo-smart battery charger applications utilizing battery packs containing Microchip’s PS700 Battery Monitor. Standard battery packs can be utilized as well. The MCP1630 Multi-Bay Li-Ion Charger provides a constant current - constant voltage charge with preconditioning, cell temperature monitoring, and battery pack fault monitoring. Each charger bay provides a status and fault indication. The MCP1630 Multi-Bay Li-Ion Charger automatically detects the insertion or removal of a battery pack.
The MCP1630 Low Cost Li-Ion Battery Charger is used to evaluate Microchip’s MCP1630 used in a SEPIC power converter application. The MCP1630 Low Cost Li-Ion Charger is capable of charging a single-cell, Li-Ion battery pack utilizing an input voltage of 6V to 18V (battery packs are not included). The MCP1630 Low Cost Li-Ion Battery Charger provides a constant current - constant voltage charge with preconditioning, cell temperature monitoring, and battery pack fault monitoring. The battery charger provides a status and fault indication. The MCP1630 Low Cost Li-Ion Battery Charger automatically detects the insertion or removal of a battery pack.

Low Cost NiMH Battery Charger board preprogrammed to charge 3 NiMH cells. Charge profile and number of batteries can be changed with firmware. The design uses the MCP1630 High-Speed Analog PWM combined with the PIC microcontroller. Charge current is initially set for 1.35A fast charge.

The MCP1630 SEPIC Automotive LED Driver Reference Design is a step-up/down, Switch mode, DC-DC converter used for powering LED applications. The demo board provides a 350 mA (700 mA, with hardware modification) constant current source. Other output currents can be obtained with minor modifications to the board components’ values. In addition, the board sustains the high-voltage peaks and hence provides useful information about typical high-voltage applications that can be found in the automotive field.

Devices Supported:  MCP1630
The MCP1630V Bi-directional 4 Cell Li-Ion Charger Reference Design demonstrates the use of a bidirectional buck-boost converter used to charge multiple series cell Li-Ion batteries with the presence of an input source (boost) and provide a regulated output voltage when the input source is removed (buck). The board also serves as a platform to evaluate the MCP1630V device.

The MCP1631HV Digitally Controlled Programmable Current Source Reference Design is used to drive and dim one or more power LEDs in a series or parallel topology (depending on the LED’s capability). The reference design may also be used to charge one to four cell NiMH/NiCd or one to two cell Li-Ion battery packs. The board uses the MCP1631HV high-speed analog PWM controller and PIC16F616 microcontroller to generate the proper dimming ratio for LEDs or charge algorithm for NiMH, NiCd and Li-Ion batteries. The boards is used to evaluate Microchip’s MCP1631HV in a SEPIC power converter application.

The MCP1631 Multi-Chemistry Battery Charger Reference Design is a complete stand-alone constant current battery charger for NiMH, NiCd or constant current / constant voltage for Li-Ion battery packs. When charging NiMH or NiCd batteries, the reference design is capable of charging one, two, three or four batteries connected in series. If Li-Ion chemistry is selected, the board is capable of charging one or two series batteries. This board utilizes Microchip’s MCP1631HV (high-speed PIC® MCU PWM TSSOP-20) and PIC16F883 (28 pin SSOP). The input voltage range for the demo board is 5.5V to 16V.

The MCP1631HV Multi-Chemistry reference design board is used to charge one to five NiMH or NiCd batteries, charge one or two cell Li-Ion batteries, or drive one or two 1W LEDs. The board uses the MCP1631HV high speed analog PWM and PIC16F883 to generate the charge algorithm for NiMH, NiCd or Li-Ion batteries. The MCP1631HV Multi-Chemistry Battery Charger is used to evaluate Microchip’s MCP1631HV in a SEPIC power converter application.

The MCP1640 Single Quadruple-A Battery Boost Converter Reference Design demonstrates how the MCP1640 device, with the True Output Disconnect Shutdown option, works attached to a microcontroller application. This board demonstrates how to optimize battery life using the MCP1640, and an 8-bit low cost PIC microcontroller, to reduce the No Load Input Current for applications that operate in Standby mode for a long period of time. During Standby, the enable signal for the MCP1640 has a low frequency, with less than 1% positive duty cycle. This maintains the output of the MCP1640 device up to 2.3V, which is sufficient to keep the PIC microcontroller live. This solution reduces up to 80% of the No Load Input Current the MCP1640 consumes in PFM Mode.
The MCP1661 Flyback Converter Reference Design provides an example of a galvanically isolated power supply.The board is used to evaluate and demonstrate Microchip Technology's MCP1661 in the following topology:

- 5V output Isolated Flyback Converter application supplied from 5V typical input voltage.

It is used to evaluate the 5-Lead SOT-23 package.
By changing the LDO, a lower/higher output voltage than 5V will be obtained, but with different capabilities regarding maximum output current and efficiency.
The MCP1665 12V output boost regulator evaluation board is intended to provide a platform allowing customers to easily evaluate the features of the MCP1665 device in a typical boost toplogy while also providing a reference for proper choice and layout of components that are critical to switching regulator implementations.
The MCP19035 600 kHz Synchronous Buck Converter Controller is a compact, highly efficient, step-down voltage converter that will convert the input voltage rail (typically 24V) to 5V regulated output voltage. The maximum output current for this step-down converter is 5A. The board demonstrates the capabilities of the MCP19035 600 kHz Synchronous Buck Converter Controller in a typical high-voltage input step-down application. Test points for various signals are provided for measuring different parameters of the converter. The reference design can be modified to support output voltages from 3.3V to 5V by changing a single resistor.
The MCP19111 is a digitally-enhanced PWM controller. It combines a pure-analog PWM controller with a supervisory microcontroller making it a fast, cost-effective, and configurable power conversion solution. The MCP19111 is ideal for standard DC-DC conversion, LED drivers, and battery charging applications. The ARD00609 Demo Board demonstrates how the MCP19111 device operates as a PMBus-enabled POL converter over a wide input voltage and load range. The firmware is preloaded in the MCP19111, no software development is needed. An USB to PMBus bridge is included on board allowing direct communication with a PC. Nearly all operational and control system parameters are programmable and readable via the PMBus. A full featured and easy to use GUI may be downloaded from the Microchip site. Alternatively, the user can program the MCP19111 using their own firmware, tailoring it to their application. The evaluation board contains headers for ICSP™ (In-Circuit Serial Programming™) I2C / PMBus communication and mini USB connector.

Devices Supported: MCP19111

PLEASE NOTE: This kit does NOT contain the hardware programming tool. Please use Microchip’s PICKIT3 (PG164130).
The MCP3421 Battery Fuel Gauge Demo Board demonstrates how to measure the battery voltage and discharging current using the MCP3421.

The MCU algorithm calculates the battery fuel being used. This demo board is shipped with 1.5V AAA non-rechargeable battery. The demo board displays the following parameters:

  • Measured battery voltage. 
  • Measured battery discharging current. 
  • Battery Fuel Used (calculated). 

The MCP3421 Battery Fuel Gauge Demo Board also can charge a single-cell 4.2V
Li-Ion battery. This feature, however, is disabled by firmware since the demo kit is shipped to customer with non-rechargeable 1.5V AAA battery.

Please contact Microchip Technology Inc if you want to use the battery rechargeable feature.

The MCP3421 Weight Scale Demo Board is designed to evaluate the performance of the low-power consumption, 18-bit ADC in an electronic weight scale design. Next to the MCP3421 there is a low-noise, auto-zero MCP6V07 op amp. This can be used to investigate the impact of extra gain added before the ADC for performance improvement. The PIC18F4550 is controlling the LCD and the USB communication with the PC. The GUI is used to indicate the performance parameters of the design and for calibration of the weight scale.

Devices Supported: MCP3421, MCP6V07, PIC18F4550
This 1” by 1” board is designed to demonstrate the performance of the MCP3550/1/3 devices in a simple low-cost application. The circuit uses a ratiometric sensor configuration and uses the system power supply as the voltage reference. The extreme common mode rejection capability of the MCP355X devices, along with their excellent normal mode power supply rejection at 50 and 60 Hz, allows for excellent system performance.

The MCP3905A Energy Meter Reference Design (using the new MCP3905A/06A device) is a stand-alone low cost energy meter. It can act as either a stand alone energy meter, or as the analog front end design for LCD microcontroller based meters. The MCP3905 design is specified with an energy measurement error of 0.1% typical across 1:500 dynamic range for high accurate energy meter designs. This reference design is compliant with EMC requirements per energy metering standards IEC62053 and legacy IEC61036, IEC1046 and IEC687.

The MCP3911 and PIC18F85K90 Single-Phase Anti-Tamper Energy Meter is a fully functional single-phase meter with enhanced capabilities, such as battery backup, RTC and anti-tamper features. The two current channels are measured with the MCP3911 device and the voltage channel is measured with the 12-bit SAR ADC integrated in the microcontroller. This design has two sensors for the current measurements: a current transformer and a shunt. The PIC18F85K90 microcontroller directly drives the LCD and communicates via UART with the MCP2200, offering an isolated USB connection for meter calibration and access to the device power calculations. The system calculates active and reactive energy, active, reactive and apparent power, power factor, RMS current, RMS voltage and the line frequency. The Microchip Energy Meter Software is used to calibrate and monitor the system.
The MCP39F501 Power Monitor Demonstration Board is a fully functional single-phase power monitor. This low-cost design does not use any transformers and requires few external components. The device calculates active power, reactive power, RMS current, RMS voltage, power factor, line frequency and other typical power quantities as defined in the MCP39F501 data sheet. The MCP39F501 Power Monitor Utility software is used to calibrate and monitor the system, and can be used to create custom calibration setups. For some accuracy requirements, only a single point calibration may be needed.

Devices Supported: MCP39F501
The MCP39F511 Power Monitor Demonstration Board is a fully functional single-phase power and energy monitoring system. The system calculates and displays active power, reactive power, RMS current, RMS voltage, active energy (both import and export), and four quadrant reactive energy.

It connects easily through USB to the “Power Monitor Utility Software” that offers automated control to allow you to easily experiment with all system configuration settings such as PWM output frequencies, zero crossing detection options, and event configurations, among many others.

The “MCP39F511 Power Monitor Utility” software can also be used to and be used to create custom calibration setups. For most accuracy requirements, only a single-point calibration is needed. The energy meter software offers an automated calibration process that can be used to quickly calibrate energy meters and allow you to experiment with different calibration procedures.

The MCP39F511 Smart Plug is a fully functional power meter capable of transmitting its data over a Bluetooth® interface to an Android phone or tablet. It is designed to stand between the wall outlet and any electronic device that the user wants to control and monitor remotely. The system calculates the real-time values of the RMS current, RMS voltage, frequency, active, reactive and apparent power, power factor and also the energy consumption.
The MCP39F511 Smart Plug allows remote power control to save energy when the user turns an unused device off, instead of keeping it in stand-by (still consuming power). It also offers an easy way of monitoring the electrical behavior of home devices and appliances, allowing early detection of malfunctions if an over power or over current event is observed.
The free Android application for the MCP39F511 Smart Plug can be found on the Google Play Store under "Microchip Smart Plug".

 

The MCP39F511N Power Monitor Demonstration Board is a fully functional dual channel single-phase power and energy monitoring system. The system calculates and displays active power, reactive power, RMS current, RMS voltage, active energy (both import and export), and four quadrant reactive energy), on 2 independent channels, simultaneously.

It connects easily through USB to the “Power Monitor Utility Software” that offers automated control to allow you to easily experiment with all system configuration settings such as PWM output frequencies, zero crossing detection options, and event configurations, among many others.

The “MCP39F511N Power Monitor Utility” software can also be used to and be used to create custom calibration setups. For most accuracy requirements, only a single-point calibration is needed. The energy meter software offers an automated calibration process that can be used to quickly calibrate energy meters and allow you to experiment with different calibration procedures.
The MCP39F521 Power Monitor Demonstration Board is a fully functional I2C bus single-phase power and energy monitoring system. Up to four different devices can be placed on the same I2C bus through address select pins. The system calculates and displays active power, reactive power, RMS current, RMS voltage, active energy (both import and export), and four quadrant reactive energy.

It connects easily through USB to the “Power Monitor Utility Software” that offers automated control to allow you to easily experiment with all system configuration settings such as zero crossing detection options and event configurations, among many others.

The “Power Monitor Utility” software can also be used to and be used to create custom calibration setups. For most accuracy requirements, only a single-point calibration is needed. The energy meter software offers an automated calibration process that can be used to quickly calibrate energy meters and allow you to experiment with different calibration procedures.
This demo board uses the MCP661 in a very basic application for high-speed op amps; a 50Ω line (coax) driver. It gives:
  • A 30 MHz solution
  • High speed PCB layout techniques
  • A means to test AC response, step response and distortion
Both the input and the output are connected to lab equipment with 50Ω BNC cables. There are 50Ω terminating resistors and transmission lines on the board. The op amp is set to a gain of 2V/V to overcome the loss at its output caused by the 50Ω resistor at that point. Connecting lab supplies to the board is simple; there are three surface mount test points provided for this purpose.

The MCP6L2 and PIC18F66J93 Energy Meter is a fully functional single-phase meter that uses the 12-bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) integrated in the microcontroller. This low-cost design has a shunt as the current sensor. The signal from the shunt is amplified by two external operational amplifiers and applied to the input of the ADC. The PIC18F66J93 directly drives the LCD and communicates via UART with the MCP2200, offering an isolated USB connection for meter calibration and access to the device power calculations. The system calculates active and reactive energy; active, reactive and apparent power; power factor; RMS current; RMS voltage, and line frequency.

Devices Supported: MCP6L2


The Microchip energy meter software is used to calibrate and monitor the system. The calibration can be done in closed loop or open loop. When connected to a stable source of voltage and current, the meter can do an auto-calibration by including the open loop calibration routine and formulas in the firmware.
This board demonstrates the performance of Microchip’s MCP6N11 instrumentation amplifier (INA) and a traditional three op amp INA using Microchip’s MCP6V26 and MCP6V27 auto-zeroed op amps. The input signal comes from an RTD temperature sensor in a Wheatstone bridge. Real world interference is added to the bridge’s output, to provide realistic performance comparisons. Data is gathered and displayed on a PC, for ease of use. The USB PICmicro® microcontroller and included Graphical User Interface (GUI) provides the means to configure the board and collect sample data.
The MCP6V01 Thermocouple Auto-Zeroed Reference Design demonstrates how to use a difference amplifier system to measure electromotive force (EMF) voltage at the cold junction of thermocouple in order to accurately measure temperature at the hot junction. This can be done by using the MCP6V01 auto-zeroed op amp because of its ultra low offset voltage (VOS) and high common mode rejection ratio (CMRR)

Devices Supported: MCP6V01 Auto-Zeroed Op Amp
Portable electronics has played an important role in modern era. Due to the natural characteristics of Li-Ion / Li-Polymer batteries, they are the most popular power sources for mobile devices. However, extra care in design is always important to implement Li-Ion / Li-Polymer batteries. System Power Path Management allows end-users to charge their batteries without interruption.

This reference design is developed to assist product designers in reducing product design cycle and time by utilizing Microchip’s favorite stand-alone Li-Ion battery charge management controllers with system power path management.

The MCP9600 Evaluation Board is used to digitize the Thermocouple EMF voltage to degree Celsius with +/-1C accuracy. Users can easily evaluate the all device features using a Type K thermocouple. The device also supports Types J, T, N, E, B, S and R. Each of these types are evaluated by replacing the Type K Thermocouple connector with the corresponding connectors (not included).

In addition, evaluation board connects to PC via USB interface. Temperature can be data-logged using Microchip Thermal Management Software Graphical User Interface (GUI).
The MCP9700 Thermistor Demo Board contains the analog circuitry to measure temperature. It uses BC Components’ 232264055103 NTC thermistor to convert temperature to resistance. The thermistor is placed in a voltage divider which converts resistance to voltage. This voltage is filtered and placed at the MCP6S22 Programmable Gain Amplifier’s (PGA) CH0 input. The PGA gains and buffers the thermistor.In addition, the board includes the MCP9700 Linear Active Thermistor. The MCP9700 outputs voltage proportional to temperature. A PIC18F2550 is used to both measure the voltage output of the MCP9700 and the MCP6S22 using an integrated 10-bit Analog to Digital Converter and communicate to a PC via USB interface.Temperature can be datalogged using Microchip Thermal Management Software Graphical User Interface (GUI).
The MIC23158/9 Evaluation Board has been developed to evaluate the capabilities of the MIC23158/9 family of devices. The board is populated with the MIC23159 device and it’s set for the following voltages:
•Regulator 1: 1.8V.
•Regulator 2: 1.5V.
The evaluation board can be easily modified by interchanging the MIC23159 device with MIC23158.​
The MIC23158/9 Evaluation Board features independent Enable connectors with individual pull-up resistors.
To check the status of each regulator, power-good connectors are available for each regulator. The board can be powered from two independent voltage sources or a 0Ω resistor can be placed on R3 so that both converters be powered form the same voltage source.
MIC2877 is a compact and highly-efficient 2MHz synchronous boost regulator with a 6.5A switch. It features a bidirectional true load disconnect function which prevents any leakage current between the input and output when the device is disabled. MIC2877 operates in bypass mode automatically when the input voltage is greater than the target output voltage. At light loads, the boost converter goes to PFM mode to improve the efficiency. In shutdown mode, the regulator consumes less than 2uA. MIC2877 also features an integrated anti-ringing switch to minimize EMI, over voltage and over current protection, UVLO and thermal shutdown. MIC2877 is available in a FTQFN22-8LD package with a junction temperature range of -40°C to +125°C.​
The PT100 RTD Evaluation Board demonstrates how to bias a Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) and accurately measure temperature. Up to two RTDs can be connected. The RTDs are biased using constant current source and the output voltage is scaled using a difference amplifier. In addition to the difference amplifier, a multiple input channel Programmable Gain Amplifier (PGA) MCP6S26 is used to digitally switch between RTDs and increase the scale up to 32 times.

The output of the difference amplifier is connected to a 12-bit differential Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) MCP3301. The ADC outputs serial data to the PIC18F2550 using a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). The data is transmitted to a PC using a USB interface.

A Graphical User Interface (GUI) is used to acquire the data. The acquired data is graphed as a real-time stripchart display. In addition, the user can select input channels, acquisition interval, and stripchart display buffer size.

The demo board is a complete stand-alone smoke detector application with a smoke chamber emulator. The demo board allows evaluation of all the functions of the RE46C190. Key test points of the device are available at the bottom edge of the demo board. It is designed for battery operation using a CR123A battery or can be operated using a power supply. The RE46C190 application circuit is on the right side of the board by the battery holder and piezo horn and the smoke chamber emulator is on the left. The smoke chamber emulator can be disconnected from the application circuit and a photo smoke chamber or its components can be connected to the demo board.

Devices Supported: RE46C190
The RTD Reference Design demonstrates how to instrument Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) and accurately measure temperature. This solution uses the MCP3551 22-Bit Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) to measure voltage across the RTD. The ADCand the RTD are referenced using an onboard reference voltage and the ADC inputs are directly connected to the RTD terminals. This provides a ratio metric temperature measurement. The solution uses a current limiting resistor to bias the RTD. It providesa reliable and accurate RTD instrumentation without the need for extensive circuitcompensation and calibration routines.

In addition, this reference design includes a silicon temperature sensor, MCP9804. This sensor is used for comparison only, it is not needed to instrument an RTD. The MCP3551 and MCP9804 outputs are read using a USB PIC® MCU. This controller is also connected to a PC using a USB interface. The Thermal Management software is used to plot the RTD temperature data in stripchart format.

Devices Supported: MCP3551, MCP9804
The Thermocouple Reference Design demonstrates how to instrument a Thermocouple and accurately sense temperature over the entire Thermocouple measurement range. This solution uses the MCP3421 18-Bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) to measure voltage across the Thermocouple.

This UCS1002 and PIC16F1503 Reference Design is a fully functional universal serial bus (USB) charger compatible with a large variety of portable devices. The UCS1002 programmable port-power controller can deliver up to 2.5A charging current. Features like current monitoring and programmable charger emulation profiles make it a good candidate to be used with a PIC® Microcontroller for intelligent USB charging solutions. The algorithm implemented in the PIC microcontroller applies multiple charger emulation profiles and selects the one that provides the highest current to the attached device. For more information regarding the code, refer to AN1827 – "UCS1002 Highest Current Algorithm Using a PIC® Microcontroller” (DS20001827A). The board can be powered from 5V directly or through the MCP16323 Synchronous Buck Regulator which allows 6-18V input.