Microchip Technology Inc

Thermal

The MCP9902 Temp Sensor Evaluation Board provides the means to demonstrate all of the MCP9902 features, and allows a  user to view and modify registers. A user may plot the temperature of the two temperature channels and set alert temperatures associated with those channels. LEDs indicating status information and test points are included to enable system voltages monitoring, using a voltmeter or an oscilloscope. The board requires only one universal serial bus (USB) connection to power the board. The USB-to-SMBus bridge regulates the +5V USB power to +3.3V used by the MCP9902 and other evaluation board circuitry.
The EMC1182 Temp Sensor Evaluation Board provides the means to demonstrate all of the EMC1182 features, and allows to view and modify registers. LEDs indicating status information and test points are included to enable system voltages monitoring, using a voltmeter or an oscilloscope. The board requires only one universal serial bus (USB) connection to power the board. The USB-to-SMBus bridge regulates the +5V USB power to +3.3V used by the EMC1182 and other evaluation board circuitry.
The EMC1412 Evaluation Board provides the means to demonstrate the EMC1412 features and to view and modify registers through USB. LED indicators and test points are included to show status information and a fan driver circuit linearly drives a 5V fan to 3 different speeds based on programmable temperature limits.

Devices Supported: EMC1412
The EMC1701 Single Channel High-Side DC Current and Temperature Sense Evaluation Board is a USB-based platform that provides the means to evaluate features and to view and modify registers of the EMC1701 device. LEDs indicate status information and test points are included to monitor system voltages with a user-provided voltmeter or oscilloscope.

Devices Supported:  EMC1701
The EMC2101 Dual Temperature Sensor and Single Fan Controller Evaluation Board is a USB-based platform that provides the means to demonstrate EMC2101 features and to view and modify registers. A +5V is provided to demonstrate the fan control functionality. LEDs indicate status information and test points are included to monitor system voltages with a user provided voltmeter tor oscilloscope.
The EMC2103 Quad Temperature Sensor and Single Fan Controller Evaluation Board is a USB-based platform that provides the means to demonstrate EMC2103 features and to view and modify registers. LEDs indicate status information and test points are included to monitor system voltages with a user provided voltmeter or oscilloscope.

Devices Supported:  EMC2103
The MCP9700 Temperature-to-Voltage Converter PICtail™ Demo Board demonstrates how to interface the MCP9700 to a microcontroller. This can be used by the system designer as an example of how to integrate an analog temperature sensor into systems.

The MCP9700 Thermistor Demo Board contains the analog circuitry to measure temperature. It uses BC Components’ 232264055103 NTC thermistor to convert temperature to resistance. The thermistor is placed in a voltage divider which converts resistance to voltage. This voltage is filtered and placed at the MCP6S22 Programmable Gain Amplifier’s (PGA) CH0 input. The PGA gains and buffers the thermistor.In addition, the board includes the MCP9700 Linear Active Thermistor. The MCP9700 outputs voltage proportional to temperature. A PIC18F2550 is used to both measure the voltage output of the MCP9700 and the MCP6S22 using an integrated 10-bit Analog to Digital Converter and communicate to a PC via USB interface.Temperature can be datalogged using Microchip Thermal Management Software Graphical User Interface (GUI).
The MCP9800 Temperature Data Logger Demo Board allows user to store up to 128000 temperature readings from the MCP9800 sensor to the 24LC1025, Microchip’s 1024Kbit EEPROM. The PIC16F684 PICmicro® Microcontroller communicates with the sensor and EEPROM. In addition, the PICmicro® interfaces to a PC using the PICkit™ 1 Flash Starter Kit and transfers the temperature readings from the EEPROM to the PC. Microsoft Excel can be used to view the data. The PICkit™ 1 Flash Starter Kit can also be used to reprogram the onboard PICmicro®. The user can specify number of measurements and measurement duration.

The MCP9800 Temperature Data Logger Demo Board can be powered using an external supply, the PICkit™ 1 Flash Starter Kit, or a 24 mm Lithium Battery. The battery allows for stand-alone operations.

The MCP9800 Temp Sensor SEEVAL® 32 Data Logger board is a PCB assembly that uses a PIC10F202 to read Temperature Data using I2C communication from a Microchip MCP9800 Temperature Sensor, and stores that data, also using I2C communication, to a 24LC16B Serial EEPROM. The board can then be placed into a SEEVAL®32 Serial EEPROM Evaluation tool and the content can be read and stored into a .hex file. We have also provided an Excel Spreadsheet that can be used to import the .hex file so that the data may be graphed on your computer screen.

The MCP9800 Temperature Sensor Demo Board demonstrates the sensor’s features. Users can connect the demo board to a PC with USB interface and evaluate the sensor performance. The 7-Segment LED displays temperature in degrees Celsius or degrees Fahrenheit; the temperature alert feature can be set by the users using an on board potentiometer. An alert LED is used to indicate an over temperature condition. In addition, temperature can be datalogged using the Microchip Thermal Management Software Graphical User Interface (GUI). The sensor registers can also be programmed using the GUI.
The MCP9800 Thermal Sensor PICtail™ Demo Board demonstrates how to interface the MCP9800 to a PICmicro® microcontroller using the PICkit™ 1 Flash Starter Kit as a platform. The kit includes:

  • A PIC16F684 14-pin Flash-based 8-bit CMOS microcontroller that can be used with PICkit™ 1 Flash Starter Kit
  • Firmware that provides the I2C™ interface and temperature conversion routines to communicate with the MCP9800 and convert serial data to temperature data
The MCP9800 Thermal Sensor PICtail Demo Board can also be used as a stand-alone module to quickly add thermal sensing capability to any existing application. This basic sensor functionality is implemented on a small Printed Circuit Board (PCB) and an interface via a standard 100 mil header.

The PT100 RTD Evaluation Board demonstrates how to bias a Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) and accurately measure temperature. Up to two RTDs can be connected. The RTDs are biased using constant current source and the output voltage is scaled using a difference amplifier. In addition to the difference amplifier, a multiple input channel Programmable Gain Amplifier (PGA) MCP6S26 is used to digitally switch between RTDs and increase the scale up to 32 times.

The output of the difference amplifier is connected to a 12-bit differential Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) MCP3301. The ADC outputs serial data to the PIC18F2550 using a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). The data is transmitted to a PC using a USB interface.

A Graphical User Interface (GUI) is used to acquire the data. The acquired data is graphed as a real-time stripchart display. In addition, the user can select input channels, acquisition interval, and stripchart display buffer size.

The RN4677 PICtail/PICtail Plus is a Bluetooth Dual Mode development board using the Microchip RN4677 Bluetooth Dual Mode module. The RN4677 module is a Dual mode Bluetooth module that complies with Bluetooth Core Specification 4.0. The RN4677 uses a simple ASCII command interface over the UART. The board enables evaluation of the RN4677 and development of Bluetooth low Energy applications in two different ways:

1) Out of the box:  When plugged into the USB port of a PC, the board will enumerate as a Communication Device Class (CDC) Serial device.  Through a terminal program, users can configure and control the module and transfer data using the easy to use provided command set.

2) As a PICtail/PICtail Plus, the board interfaces to one of hundreds of available PIC Microcontrollers through this  standard Microchip interface.  The PICtail bridges the host MCU UART to the RN4677's UART interface for data transfer or configuration using the straight-forward, easy-to-use ASCII style command set.
The RTD Reference Design demonstrates how to instrument Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) and accurately measure temperature. This solution uses the MCP3551 22-Bit Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) to measure voltage across the RTD. The ADCand the RTD are referenced using an onboard reference voltage and the ADC inputs are directly connected to the RTD terminals. This provides a ratio metric temperature measurement. The solution uses a current limiting resistor to bias the RTD. It providesa reliable and accurate RTD instrumentation without the need for extensive circuitcompensation and calibration routines.

In addition, this reference design includes a silicon temperature sensor, MCP9804. This sensor is used for comparison only, it is not needed to instrument an RTD. The MCP3551 and MCP9804 outputs are read using a USB PIC® MCU. This controller is also connected to a PC using a USB interface. The Thermal Management software is used to plot the RTD temperature data in stripchart format.

Devices Supported: MCP3551, MCP9804
(Consider MCP9700 Temperature-to-Voltage Converter PICtail Demo Board)

The TC1047A Temperature to Voltage Converter PICtail Demo Board demonstrates how to interface the TC1047A Temperature to Voltage Sensor device to a microcontroller. This board can connect directly to the PICkit 1 Flash Starter Kit, providing a platform for code development and evaluation. The system designer will be able to use this design as an example of how to integrate an analog temperature sensor in their system

Recommended Replacement Board(s): 
The TC72 functionality can be evaluated using the general purpose 8-pin MSOP package Evaluation Board (SOIC8EV

The TC72 Digital Temperature Sensor PICtail Demo Board (TC72DM-PICTL) is Obsolete

The TC72 Digital Temperature Sensor PICtail Demo Board demonstrates how to interface the TC72 Temperature Sensor device to a microcontroller. This board can connect directly to the PICkit 1 Flash Starter Kit, providing a platform for code development and evaluation. The system designer will be able to use this design as an example of how to integrate a digital temperature sensor in their system.

Devices Supported:  
TC72

The TC77 Thermal Sensor PICtail Demo Board demonstrates how to interface the TC77 Thermal Sensor device to a microcontroller. This board can connect directly to the PICkit 1 Flash Starter Kit, providing a platform for code development and evaluation. The system designer will be able to use this design as an example of how to integrate a digital temperature sensor in their system.
The Thermocouple Reference Design demonstrates how to instrument a Thermocouple and accurately sense temperature over the entire Thermocouple measurement range. This solution uses the MCP3421 18-Bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) to measure voltage across the Thermocouple.